About cynthiakinusa

I am out and about in San Diego, creating networks of good hearted people, exciting places, discovering fine foods and music and adopting projects!

The spiritual nature of patterns

As a rug enthusiast i live and breathe patterns. Patterns are key in good design. They are also essential in high level math, physics, music, chemistry, and even our own DNA. I have often felt that when people are selecting rugs to decorate their homes they respond to certain patterns better than others almost seemingly at a soul level.

I began to ponder this as some patterns are found in very far flung cultures that have similarity with ones close by. Like the feather type patterns found in the Heriz carpets of Iran and the Navajo rugs of Native Americans. I have also seen a stick figure fish in the patterns in the art of the Aborigines of Australia that is the same woven in rugs of The Baluchi people of Iran and found in the paintings of the rain-forest Indians, the Xingu of Brazil. This even inspired me to look into the study of language as symbol, Semiotics and I do hope one day to go to Arrhaus University in Denmark to study.

On a more simple level, weavers have incorporated things of nature and things with great value as patterns in their weaving.  The Buddhist rugs for Tibet or China have deep religious significance as well the forms of both Islam and Zoroaster in the Persian weaving.  It is also not uncommon to see more Shamanistic forms like the deer or bird or the cross most associated with Christianity.

My message here is that in many cases rugs serve a higher purpose than just decoration.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Krazy for kilims

This time my passion has been directed to kilims. In my various place I write I have explored this week the world of kilims. Many countries are makers of this versatile flat weave.  You can go on a treasure hunt to my facebook  pages of Rug Goddess, and writing for the 4th Avenue Rug Gallery Facebook page. Or better yet give me  a clue what you would like to talk about!Image

Nomadic Influences

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Nomadic Influences

Write something the Facebook prompter beckoned! So I write, not always a willing slave to social media I reflected on the fact that it is time for a new article for my rug goddess page! Nomadic I have been called, wandering from place to place, idea to idea. This week’s musings through the veil of winter flu had been about things like rugs from Afghanistan, Lahore, and places like Kerman and rugs made in the mountains! When I start asking the questions of myself all kinds of answers come to mind. The challenges of restorations and my favorite visual description of hanging by a thread with such stunning inventory that surrounds me daily one would imagine greatness. There is, yet my senses have been filled by the suppleness of Gabbeh rugs from the Quashquai tribes of southern Iran. The starkness of a landscape with a few sheep or goat in this day and age to still be nomadic is an incredible thing for sure!

Take a look here: http://www.truckeerug.com/gabbeh.html

The Wonder of Sarouk Rugs

The wonder of Sarouk rugs continues to inspire me. This weekend I found a photograph of my grandparents’ house in Boston. On the living room floor was a patterned rug that I spent hours as a child tracing with my fingers, imagining the stories from where it was made.  It was the center of the house, a surface we all gathered on. When we sold grandmothers house we gifted the rug to a cousin.  Many years late, when I began working in this historical and unusual field I began to understand indeed it was a magical rug.

 I am sure it was from Sarouk! My question then is but from when it has left me pondering for many years. Was it a painted SarouK? Did they get it in the 50’s when they moved into that house? Did it come from my great grandmothers?  There is no one left from that generation, sadly.  I would believe it was a painted Sarouk from the 40’s? Where is it now? So you can see how a legend is made; So take my advice learn what you can, it will only make you want to learn even more!

Sarouk Rug is a type of Persian rug from the province of Arak in Iran.

Sarouk (also Saruk or Sarough) rugs are those woven in the village of Saruk and also the city of Arak, Iran and the surrounding countryside. Sarouk rugs have been produced for much of the last century. The early successes of the Sarouk rug are largely owed to the American market. From the 1910s to 1950s, the “American Sarouk” also known as the “Painted Sarouk” was produced. American customers had an affinity for the Sarouk’s curvilinear and floral designs. What they did not appreciate, however, was the color, so for much of the 1920s, 30s and 40s, rugs exported from Iran would get a dye job to a desirable, deep, raspberry-red color, once they made it to the States.

Sarouk rugs continue to be produced today, using the same methods as during early production – with the exception of the post-production dye job. Known for their exceptional quality and ability to withstand decades of wear, Sarouks continue to be a best seller of the Persian rugs. They are made with a high quality, tough wool using a Persian knot. A tell-tale sign of a Sarouk is usually its blue weft threads, salmon or tomato-red color mixed with ivory and blues, and a very traditional, floral style. The finest of the modern Sarouk rugs comes from the small town of Ghiassabad.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarouk_rug

Fascinating Bahktiari Rugs

What fascinates me this week is the color and vibrancy of Bahktiari rugs. I see that there is a as much known and shared about them as there is so much more to be discovered.  The people of Bahktiair have been featured in films and such and yet remain a fascinating mystery.

True nomads their weaving is all in part of their way of life. This group has been documented in the movie “Grass”.  Their lives very private, they have been a cultural interest item to historians and scholars worldwide.  How do they maintain their dedication to an ancient style of life in such modern and trying times?

The theme of many of their weavings is the panel design, a window to the garden.  I tend to feel it means more than that, a window to the soul. There is a part of us that remembers the ancestral memories. Where we can from, how we tilled the soil and raised the animals to survive in a world familiar with the beauty and harshness of nature.

In my musings here I would love for you to spend a little to time to learn about these wanderers with whom we share the planet and our history of the human race.

http://www.youtube.com/channel/HCBLT8iJ-KhJ0

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grass_(1925_film)

Under the Rug

So many idioms in our modern world have connections to rug.  I am sharing a few as well as the ones that include wool.  Rugs have been a part of society for a very long time, that some every day expressions have referenced the rug.  When one understand that this unique art form has been around since the beginning of time

sweep something under the rug

to hide something embarrassing sweep something under the carpet The scandal was swept under the rug because of the important people involved in it.

See also: rugsweep

Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2003. Reproduced with permission.

pull the rug from under somebody/something   also pull the rug from under somebody’s feet

to suddenly take away help or support from someone, or to suddenly do something which causes many problems for them The school pulled the rug from under the basketball team by making them pay to practise in the school gymnasium.

See also: pullrug

Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006. Reproduced with permission.

Pull the wool over your eyes

Meaning To deceive, to hoodwink.

Origin The natural assumption is that this phrase derives from the wearing of woollen wigs, which were fashionable for both men and women in the 16th and 17th centuries. The phrase itself is of 19th century American origin. The earliest example that I can find of it in print is from the Milwaukee Daily Sentinel And Gazette, October 1839:

“And we ask one question that they dare not firmly answer, whether they are not now making a tolerable attempt to pull the wool over the eyes of the people.”

The ‘wig’ derivation is probably correct but there must be an element of doubt about it as the wearing of wigs had largely died out in the USA by the early 19th century. The tradition has continued in Europe where the judiciary of several countries wear wigs in court. Not so in the USA, where the third president Thomas Jefferson (president between 1801 – 1809), although a wig wearer himself, advised the judiciary there:

“For Heaven’s sake discard the monstrous wig which makes the English judges look like rats peeping through bunches of oakum.”

 Pull the wool over your eyes

Meaning To deceive, to hoodwink.

Origin The natural assumption is that this phrase derives from the wearing of woollen wigs, which were fashionable for both men and women in the 16th and 17th centuries. The phrase itself is of 19th century American origin. The earliest example that I can find of it in print is from the Milwaukee Daily Sentinel And Gazette, October 1839:

“And we ask one question that they dare not firmly answer, whether they are not now making a tolerable attempt to pull the wool over the eyes of the people.”

The ‘wig’ derivation is probably correct but there must be an element of doubt about it as the wearing of wigs had largely died out in the USA by the early 19th century. The tradition has continued in Europe where the judiciary of several countries wear wigs in court. Not so in the USA, where the third president Thomas Jefferson (president between 1801 – 1809), although a wig wearer himself, advised the judiciary there:

“For Heaven’s sake discard the monstrous wig which makes the English judges look like rats peeping through bunches of oakum.”