Tabriz “Mahi” Rugs #rugfax#

Rugfax is my way to share knowledge to clients who ask me about what’s my rug!This first note is a partial excerpt from my letter to a client regarding their Tabriz “fish” Rug.  Tabriz is one of the oldest rug weaving centers and makes a huge diversity of types of carpets.The Persian Mahi rug is one of the classic patterns produced by the masterful carpet weavers in Tabriz. Said to originate in the Herat district of Afghanistan, the so-called Herati or  “Mahi” or “Mahi to Hos” is a Farsi nickname for an elegant motif known as fish in the pond. The Mahi design is made up of rosettes framed by a vine scroll rhombus and arching saz leaves that often resemble jumping fish with polychromatic stripes, eyes and life-like features. The four-way symmetry of the Mahi motif allows it to be combine seamless in a kaleidoscopic allover pattern or isolated and used on its own.The Tabriz Mahi motif is used for everything from border motifs to medallions and allover patterns, but the most impressive style is the Persian Tabriz Mahi rug that features an inset medallion decorated with a continuous Mahi pattern. It’s not uncommon for carpets to feature a solitary motif placed in a medallion set over a background of allover Mahi motifs woven in contrasting colors. The traditional color palette and bold allover pattern make the Persian Tabriz Mahi rug a popular choice for living areas and high-traffic spaces.Most high quality Persian Tabriz Mahi rugs are typically 50 raj or 350-375 kpsi. 

 

Published by cynthiakinusa

I am out and about in San Diego, creating networks of good hearted people, exciting places, discovering fine foods and music and adopting projects!

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